J.P. Chan 

Facebook Twitter YouTube E-mail RSS

MJ Back in the Day

MJ back in the day.

A post shared by J.P. Chan (@jpchantastic) on

 

Mid-flight Selfie

Mid-flight selfie with cool cat @uliang.

A post shared by J.P. Chan (@jpchantastic) on

 

JetBlue Station

JFK>SEA. I love JetBlue's subway homage.

A post shared by J.P. Chan (@jpchantastic) on

 

Sunday in Queens: Rocket Park

Sunday in Queens: Rocket Park

A post shared by J.P. Chan (@jpchantastic) on

 

Sunday in Queens: Unisphere

Sunday in Queens: Unisphere

A post shared by J.P. Chan (@jpchantastic) on

 

The Best View

The Best View

My life would have been very different had I grown up closer to the Hayden Planetarium. I was obsessed with space and astronomy as a kid but only got to visit the Planetarium’s predecessor a handful of times growing up. Then and now, this is a magical place.

(Hayden Planetarium, American Museum of Natural History)

 

Welcome to Eugene

Eugene

It’s been a few months since my last post, so I’ve got a small backlog to work through.

Here’s a shot from my visit to Eugene back in April. I was there to show A Picture of You at the DisOrient Film Festival.

Despite being sick the entire time I was there, I had a great time. It’s a wonderful festival in a very friendly town.

(Eugene, OR)

 

Computers for Everybody

Computers for Everybody

When it comes to computing gear, I’ve been an Apple fan since college. I love my Macs, iPhone, and iPad and wouldn’t trade them for anything. They’re reliable, beautiful, work great, and hold their resale value very well.

But I admit that when it comes to price (as opposed to value), Apple has never been the cheapest option. That’s why growing up in a working-class family, I never owned an Apple computer. We just couldn’t afford them.

But we could afford (barely) a succession of Commodore 64s and, eventually, an Amiga — all of which I got great use out of. So while I may have grown up envying my friends’ Apple IIs and Macs, I didn’t miss out on the benefits of computing. Commodore truly made computers for the masses, which I’ll always be grateful for.

Given this, I was especially happy to see these old hallmarks of my computing youth during a recent visit to the Computer History Museum. I also liked that the Commodores sat on the top shelf of their affordable early microcomputers display. For those of us who loved computers but didn’t have much to spend on them, they truly were top shelf items.

(Computer History Museum, Mountain View, CA)

 

Beijing Haze

I woke up today thinking about the passing of another year, the dreams we all have about our lives, and how we reconcile who we are with who we’d like to be.

The conclusion is always the same for me: happiness comes mostly from pursuing the dream, not necessarily achieving it. (Though achieving it every now and then is pretty nice too.)

And then I realized this is an idea I continually re-visit and re-discover, and not just on New Year’s Day. In fact, I made a short film about it six years ago. So much for progress…

In January 2008, my short film Beijing Haze premiered at Slamdance before going on to play at SXSW and a bunch of other festivals. But it’s never been available anywhere else.

Today seemed like a good time to change that. You can now watch it for free on my YouTube channel.

Of the shorts I’ve made, this is my favorite. I hope you enjoy it too.

Happy New Year everyone! Let’s all chase our dreams in 2014.

 

Monday is Cat Week: Top Shelf

Monday is Cat Week: Top Shelf

Sometime next year, this bookcase that Helena’s crouching on will probably be replaced by cat shelves. I have a feeling she can’t wait.

 
credit