Categories
Politics

MLK Day

MLK  digital ad plays on a screen at a subway entrance

I’ve been reading Stride Towards Freedom and thinking a lot about the moral power and strategic savvy of non-violent social movements.

Intellectually, it’s fairly easy to understand why non-violence is the correct way. But to read how Dr. King and countless others actually used it to resist violent oppression is profoundly inspiring. Through his actions, so many ordinary people found the extraordinary courage inside them to do what is right.

Categories
Eating Family

What to eat when you’re sick

My lofty 2021 goal of posting here everyday died after just eleven days into the new year, when I was hit hard by a stomach virus on Sunday. I’m recovering now, but the experience got me thinking about all the advice about eating one gets from friends, family, and professionals when they hear you’re sick.

There’s many, many non-medical schools of thought on what you should eat when you’re sick. But even doctors don’t always agree, even when the illness has been narrowed down to a few likely culprits. This week, a gastroenterologist suggested eating BRAT (Bananas, Rice, Apples, Tea) for my condition. But my longtime primary care physician said the priority was re-hydrating, recommending lots of apple juice and Gatorade but not so much raw apples (roughage) and tea (diuretic). I’m mostly following the latter advice, with rice and ramen-based dishes when I have the appetite.

“Don’t eat ethnic food when you’re sick”

My favorite non-professional advice on this subject was given to me by a well-meaning co-worker many years ago when I was fighting a bad cold: don’t eat ethnic food when you’re sick.

Now, you and I know what she probably meant (don’t eat spicy food) but taken literally what she advised was bland American food is the key to recovery. Which of course leads to endless questions: is that how sick people in other countries recover also? Does the attentive mom in Mumbai serve up some mac-and-cheese instead of vindaloo for her sickly six-year-old? Is there a hospital in Turkey feeding hot dogs to patients?

My co-worker was a very sweet middle-aged woman, a single mom working hard at a midtown office to keep her household afloat. So all I could do was smile and thank her for the advice. For years, it was a funny story I’d tell to others; not to mock this woman but to illustrate the amusing choice of words.

I haven’t seen this woman in nearly three decades and only this week when thinking about her advice did I remember some other details: she was Italian-American and had an adopted young Korean daughter. She loved Italian food (WHO DOESN’T) but at the tine I knew her I don’t believe she’d been exposed to the equally amazing Korean cuisine, often spicy but always delicious.

The best food to eat when you’re sick is made by someone who loves you.

I like to imagine that her advice on this subject changed over the years as they grew together and both of their worlds expanded. She was undoubtedly too loving a mom (and too passionate about good food) to deny her daughter — and herself — the delicious and comforting dishes of their homelands. I like to imagine the bowls of pasta e fagioli and sundubu jjigage they’ve made for each other over the years. I like to imagine there’s some incredible Italian-Korean hybrid dishes that are being kept between them as family secrets. I like to imagine that she’s retired now and her daughter is now the one fixing up comfort meals every now and then.

Whenever my wife is sick and needs comfort food, I make a big pot of chicken soup that we both eat for days. Even though I don’t eat meat anymore, I’ll head out to the market and buy some high-quality drumsticks and throw them into the Instant Pot with onions, garlic, salt, dried Chinese mushrooms (if I can find them) and root veggies like carrots or potatoes. And, not least, ginseng root or ginseng powder.

Thirty minutes later the house smells like chicken soup and we’re devouring a very fatty and very delicious home-style meal. And as my wife is eating it I tell her for the umpteenth time how my grandmother used to make a soup like this when I was a kid.

Categories
Family

The Case for Working with Your Hands

In 2009, Matthew B. Crawford released his book Shop Class as Soul Craft. Twelve years later, I still haven’t read the book, but have returned to this adapted essay many times and have recommended it to several friends and colleagues. There’s so much wisdom and interesting ideas and the writing is beautiful.

High-school shop-class programs were widely dismantled in the 1990s as educators prepared students to become “knowledge workers.” The imperative of the last 20 years to round up every warm body and send it to college, then to the cubicle, was tied to a vision of the future in which we somehow take leave of material reality and glide about in a pure information economy. This has not come to pass. To begin with, such work often feels more enervating than gliding. More fundamentally, now as ever, somebody has to actually do things: fix our cars, unclog our toilets, build our houses.

When we praise people who do work that is straightforwardly useful, the praise often betrays an assumption that they had no other options. We idealize them as the salt of the earth and emphasize the sacrifice for others their work may entail. Such sacrifice does indeed occur — the hazards faced by a lineman restoring power during a storm come to mind. But what if such work answers as well to a basic human need of the one who does it?

As the son of working class immigrants (Mom was a waitress; Stepdad a cook in the same restaurant), I grew up surrounded by family who worked with their hands, usually in food service but also in manufacturing and automotive repair.

None of them spoke English and they didn’t have education beyond high school, so the job opportunities were very limited. My Mom and her siblings led very hard lives, both in Taiwan and when they emigrated to the USA. Everyone lived paycheck-to-paycheck and everyone had lots of debt. Only one aunt, the one who retired from the Post Office, ever had a pension or even a 401(k).

Their kids, however, did much better — all went to university and sometimes grad or law school. It was an unspoken rule that we should not pursue our parent’s path because their sacrifices were made so that we could have more choices in life. The “better choices” were inevitably white-collar office jobs.

A gifted young person who chooses to become a mechanic rather than to accumulate academic credentials is viewed as eccentric, if not self-destructive. There is a pervasive anxiety among parents that there is only one track to success for their children. It runs through a series of gates controlled by prestigious institutions. Further, there is wide use of drugs to medicate boys, especially, against their natural tendency toward action, the better to “keep things on track.” I taught briefly in a public high school and would have loved to have set up a Ritalin fogger in my classroom. It is a rare person, male or female, who is naturally inclined to sit still for 17 years in school, and then indefinitely at work.

When it came time for college, I chose to major in politics and economics as a sort-of “pre-law” student, with a side interest in journalism. This appeared at the time to be a natural, logical step for someone of my interests and abilities.

(Years later, a lawyer who was quitting his job to pursue a Ph.D in history gave me some of the best insight about lawyering ever: people are attracted to the law because it seems respectable and well-paying and safe. But the majority are doing it because they are too scared to pursue what they really want to do. So one pursues entertainment law rather than pursuing acting and another goes into sports law because they’re too chicken to be a full-time athlete.)

In retrospect, what seemed logical at the time looks more like a failure of imagination — and courage — a few decades later. What felt like a deeply considered choice to attend university was really just mindlessly marching down the path of what I thought someone like me should be doing Not surprisingly, after I got into a prestigious university (just barely), my grades tanked. My heart was never truly in it.

I really should have taken a gap year traveling or worked for a few years as a cop or a train operator or a plumber. But the idea of a gap year was entirely foreign to anyone in my family or any of my friends. After you finished high school, you either went to college or you went to work. And work was definitely the lesser of the choices.

We just didn’t know other options existed.

Categories
Scenic Lookouts Uncategorized

On the Ferry

We now take a break from our political coverage to shop for motorcycles on Staten Island, getting there via bicycle and the Staten Island Ferry.

Tugboats are delightful.

It was cold out (low 30s, windy) but I needed to clear my head and burn some calories. After around fifteen minutes of cycling I warmed up and it was comfortable.

I have so many questions about this artwork.

I don’t think I was on the ferry at all in 2020, so it was good to be back. Crowds were sparse and every other seat was marked-off for social distancing. There were also dedicated bike seating areas with racks, which I don’t recall ever seeing before.

Lady Liberty, ever inspiring.

The ferry always moves faster than I think it will for a chunky-looking vessel. Passing the Statue of Liberty is always thrilling nonetheless.

Always a thumbs up for the Staten Island Ferry.
Categories
Politics

The most dangerous time

In TENET, one of the characters notes that the most dangerous time in human history was just after the fall of the Soviet Union, when the former republics were in disarray and the fate of their nuclear stockpiles unknown.

In 2021, a lame duck narcissist sociopath president with control of America’s nuclear arsenal insists that his election defeat was illegitimate. He rallies his supporters on a critical day. They storm the Capitol. Several people die.

From Zeynep Tufecki’s excellent newsletter:

By any reasonable definition, this is no longer a peaceful transition of power. Not only did the person who lost the election refused to concede, he falsely claimed until the very end that he had won in a landslide. While asserting that he had the right to continue his administration rather than turn it over to the legitimate winner, the president gathered his supporters on the very date that his loss was to be certified and directed them to march on the seat of government to disrupt the process—and they certainly tried. Some may have been in ridiculous looking costumes but others had guns, Molotov cocktails, explosives, zip-ties for hostages, kevlar vests, helmets and other tactical gear.

We’re not living through a peaceful transfer of power and it’s not over yet. Congress needs to remove President Trump immediately if he won’t resign.

We’re likely living in the most dangerous time any of us have ever known.

Categories
Politics

The 55 Year Old Democracy

I don’t believe President Trump actually has any core motivations beyond his own financial enrichment, but he’s been extremely good at convincing millions of Americans that he shares their worldview. He knows how to push people’s buttons — and get paid for it.

That button, of course, is racial supremacy.

Adam Serwer breaks it down quite well in “The Capitol Riot Was an Attack on Multiracial Democracy,” posted today at The Atlantic:

Demanding that a candidate who lost the Electoral College and received 7 million fewer votes than his opponent be allowed to remain president may seem a strange turn for a party that has spent the Trump years presenting itself as the vanguard of the people. But it represents an old worldview in American politics, one that dates back to the founding.

There is an element of historical truth to this worldview. America did not have universal suffrage at its founding. The Constitution accepted the existence of slavery, and imagined democracy as the responsibility of property-owning white men. But the Founders also created a society where the blessings of liberty they imagined for themselves could be extended to others, the promissory note of which Martin Luther King Jr. spoke.

Although the story of American democracy is often told as an unsteady but certain march toward a more perfect union, there have always been people who recount that story as a tragedy, one in which the Founders’ vision of limited government and individual freedom is effaced by the inclusion of those who were never meant to share it. If democracy must be set aside to defend that liberty, then so be it.

Most Americans think of the USA as one of the oldest democracies (I certainly did), but Serwer cogently argues that it’s more accurate to think of multiracial democracy only beginning in 1965 with the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Categories
Politics Uncategorized

The Attempted Coup

This ITV News report from inside the storming of the Capitol is terrifying and shocking.

Even though we were warned that right-wing violence was coming, it still feels unreal to see it unfold in the halls of Congress.

What a terrible day for the country. There are some very good signs that things are going to get better, but there’s a tough and scary journey ahead for all of us.

Categories
Eating

Guacamole

I only learned how make guacamole in the last year or so and boy do I wish I’d learned earlier. It’s so simple to make a basic version that’s delicious. I eat some every week.

I had never tried making it before because it always seemed expensive at restaurants and at grocery stores. I assumed the relatively high cost must be due to the difficulty of making it and/or the expensive ingredients.

Obviously, neither were true.

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena Monday is Cat Week

Monday is Cat Week: Karate Kat

Categories
Transit

Headhouses

(72 St-Broadway Subway Station, Manhattan)

Categories
Architecture Design Transit Urban Planning

Moynihan Train Hall

The main waiting hall.

The new Moynihan Train Hall at Penn Station opened to the public yesterday. It’s a project that was decades in the making.

I’ve been following the saga of the Farley Building redevelopment ever since I was an urban planning grad student in the late 90s and it’s a real thrill to finally see it in person. Frankly, I wasn’t sure it was going to happen in my lifetime.

Replacing Penn Station with Farley was a dream that had a perfectly poetic arc: Penn Station died so that Grand Central Terminal could be saved, then was reincarnated decades later in Farley, the adjacent McKim, Mead, and White palace that was spared Penn’s fate. All credit to Senator Moynihan, the project’s longtime sponsor and advocate.

No, the Moynihan Train Hall isn’t quite the full-on transformation of Penn Station that many urbanists had hoped for, But it’s a very good first step towards the goal of truly modernizing the infrastructure and operations at Penn.

Love seeing stairs from the platform that open into this huge space. It’s very OG Penn Station.

The location west of Eighth Avenue feels a bit lopsided today, but it points to the future of the Midtown CBD: westward expansion to Hudson Yards. In a decade or two, it’ll feel more central as the inevitable development happens around it.

I visited the site in 2017 before construction started but haven’t been back since. I only had 30 minutes today to check it out and was very pleasantly surprised at what I saw.

This is a nice clock and surprisingly subtle.
I really like these benches, which are a nod to the past without feeling overly retro. I just wish there were in the hall itself, not just the restricted waiting areas.
A nice transition to the West End Concourse and Eighth Avenue. I hope it ages well.
I think this is good v1 digital signage, but I’m hoping the designers will push further in later iterations. These are big, bright screens with lots of potential.
It’s easy to miss the mid-block arcade unless you’re headed to points west of the station but I’m glad the space doesn’t feel like an afterthought.

The 32 Street mid-block entrance is very nice. I love the artwork.

I’m looking to coming back and exploring more soon.

Categories
Self-Portraits

Happy New Year 2021

Farewell 2020, Hello 2021!

Alex, Helena, and I wish you all a healthy and happy year ahead.

Categories
Uncategorized

Merry Motor Xmas 2020

From sunny Florida, me and the missus wish you all a very Merry Christmas and holiday season.

(Disney’s Animal Kingdom, Orlando, FL)

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena Marla Uncategorized

Back to the Blog (Part 2)

Happy Birthday, Blog

Sixteen years ago today, I started a Blogger called Bklyn Bulging. It was a primarily a moblog with photos and text composed and uploaded from my Treo 600.1

Not surprisingly, the first post featured my cat.

Marla Singer in Brooklyn, December 19, 2004 (Treo 600)
Helena in Manhattan, December 19, 2020 (iPhone 12 Pro Max)

It felt like magic to instantly share images and thoughts from wherever I was at the moment. Blogging pushed all kinds of creative and nerd buttons within me. I loved it.

2004 was also the midst of a tough time in my life and I was in a very introspective place, trying to figure out how I got to where I was and where I could go next. The blog, along with the journaling I’d been doing for years, was a way to help myself sort the situation. Sharing what I saw around me and connecting it to other things on my mind and in my heart was, if nothing else, therapeutic.

(Public Service Announcement: actual official therapy from a professional was immensely helpful too. If you’re struggling and you think you need to talk to someone, do not hesitate like I did for too many years. Just please go try it.)

Blogging was also a way for me to continue to practice writing for an audience again. Peeling, the wonderful NYC Asian-American theater collective I was a member of, had recently gone defunct, closing the only public outlet I had for writing.

At the time, I hadn’t made any films yet but very badly wanted to get started. Bklyn Blggng helped keep those muscles working while I taught myself how to write and direct short films. Writing begets more writing, in my experience.

Me and my sis, aboard the Transit Museum’s Holiday Nostalgia Train, December 19, 2004.
Me with the same hoodie, December 19, 2020.

In the next installment of this series, I’ll cover more of the journey back to blogging. But today I just wanna wish the blog HBD and reflect a bit on the passage of sixteen years.

The hoodie’s still in good shape.


1In 2020, we clearly recognize this as social media, but in 2004 it was a pretty rare thing. And I remind you young whippersnappers that when Twitter got started, they were known as a microblogging service.

Categories
Uncategorized

‘An incredibly couture boutique storytelling venture’

A new David Fincher movie is always cause for celebration, not least because it means he’s going to be doing press for it. Because in my mind, Fincher’s second greatest talent is giving terrifically insightful, blunt, funny interviews about moviemaking, like this one from Vulture:

In that regard, there are two lines I want to ask you to unpack a little. One is from Kael’s essay. She writes, “The director should be in control, not because he’s the sole creative intelligence, but because only if he is in control can he liberate and utilize the talents of his coworkers.”

Pauline Kael knew a lot about watching movies. What Pauline Kael didn’t know about making movies could fill volumes, and I believe ultimately that to the detriment of cinema is the notion that everything is intentioned — this notion that the moviemaking process is like NASA. Yeah, you can have an O-ring disaster, but for the most part, you’re testing the welds, the bolts, the electrical, and then when it gets off the launch pad you’re going, “Yeah, that’s what we intended it to do.” The movie business is not like that. The movie business is an incredibly couture boutique storytelling venture, and every single designer at the head of his house works in a different way. You are stitching those garments onto bodies up to the last 45 seconds before that person walks that runway. It’s a shitshow, an incredibly chaotic circus. It’s not cold and it’s not calculable. It’s a warm, wet art.

As a small-time filmmaker, it’s always encouraging to be reminded that big-time filmmaking is also a shitshow. It’s not necessarily that us small-timers are doing it wrong, it’s just the nature of the business.

Categories
Uncategorized

World of Wong Kar Wai

This online Film at Lincoln Center retrospective looks incredible:

Contemporary cinema’s supreme rhapsodist of romantic longing, Wong Kar Wai makes mesmerizing mood pieces that swirl around themes of time, dislocation, and the yearning for human connection.

WKW was a huge influence on me when I started making short films in 2005, and it’s always been frustrating not to have access to high-quality versions of his movies.

Although I proudly owned the Criterion Collection DVD of In the Mood for Love, I’ve only been able to get so-so Hong Kong gray market DVDs of my other WKW favorites Chungking Express, Fallen Angels, and Happy Together. (I never got into Blu-Ray, so I have no clue if better versions were available on that medium.)

It’s incredibly exciting that all of his films have gotten 4K restorations. I’m looking forward to binging on this streaming bundle.

Categories
Uncategorized

Clooney on Acting

The current GQ has a great interview with George Clooney.

The whole piece is wonderful, but I particularly love how he nails the importance of specificity in acting:

He starts describing the stages of acting, all of which he went through. “The first thing you see is everybody overacts,” he says. “You’re trying to cry. Well, people don’t try to cry. Actors try to cry. People try not to cry. Right? You’re playing the event, which is always a mistake. Then you get a few years under you, and then you learn some skills, and then the next stage is you underplay everything. Nothing is specific. Everything is quiet and important and you’re looking everybody in the eye when you talk to them.”

He recalls a day on ER, a scene in which it was snowing and a patient comes into the emergency room and they’re covered in snow. “And each of the doctors who would come in would see the snow on ’em and go, ‘Is it snowing?’ And each of them would play it as if it was, you know, just the question. Like, with no opinion to it. ‘Is it snowing?’ ‘Is it snowing?’ And everyone would come in: ‘Is it snowing?’ ‘Is it snowing?’ And I watched this one actor come in, and he looked at the patient, just looked down, and goes, [in the most irritated, disappointed voice possible] ‘Is it snowing?’ And the difference in tone, the anger, that clearly he had a plan for the day and snow fucked it up, made it specific. And once it’s specific, then that’s sort of the third stage of acting to me.”

Categories
Uncategorized

All the Stars

Just lovely.

(All the Stars in the Sky Have the Same Face by Lawrence Weiner, Jewish Museum)

Categories
Uncategorized

Thanksgiving and the Pandemic (1918 edition)

It’s been a tough 2020 on every level, but crisis is often very useful for clarifying what’s important in life.

This year, I’m particularly thankful for a free press and evidence-based thinking — bedrocks of democracy and a progressive society.

No, these things did not help prevent the pandemic or stop it from getting worse, but without them there would be no hope at all.

As this USA Today story nicely illustrates, the 2020 pandemic is very much like the 1918 pandemic in so many ways.

Then, as now, Americans were divided on how to fight the virus for a variety of reasons (many of them bad). Then, as now, the virus proved indifferent to our opinions.

The right to express opinions without fear is essential to democracy. But so is following the science.

The free press is at its best when amplifying what the evidence tells us, especially when the conclusions are unpopular or even dangerous to those who lead us there.

Thank you to the many journalists out there who have been working so hard this year to track the pandemic and educate the public.

Categories
Uncategorized

The Occulus

Is it spectacular architecture? Yes.

Was it worth the cost? No.

Will it still be spectacular architecture in ten years? Probably.

Will anyone care about the cost in ten years? Probably not.

In 2030, a few urbanists will enjoy debating what might have been at this site but I suspect everyone else here will just be shopping and taking selfies like they do now.

As with many things, the results are visible but their opportunity costs aren’t.

Categories
Music

The New Pornographers

I’m embarrassed to say that I somehow never heard a New Pornographers song until this fall. Better late than never, I guess. They’re phonomenial.

This concert video is a great introduction to some of their best work. (It’s borderline criminal that there’s barely 10K views on this as of this writing.)

I can’t wait until we’re in a world where it’s safe to go to a concert again. These guys are at the top of my list.

Categories
Announcements

Back to the Blog (Part 1)

After a long hiatus, I’ve decided to give blogging another try.

I’ll explain why in a future post, but for now please excuse all the construction dust as I clean-up sixteen years worth of posts over the next few months. Many older posts won’t look right for a while and the tags and archives will be incomplete during this process.

Most of the posts from the past few years have been migrated from my Instagram and Twitter. Posts from here on out will be blog-first.

So for best results, just read the new stuff.

Categories
Moto

Road test: PASSED

(Lehman College, The Bronx)

Categories
Politics Uncategorized

YASSSS.

My neighborhood in Harlem erupting with joy.

“KAMALA HARRIS VICE PRESIDENT MOTHERF***ER!!!”

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena

Self-Care

It’s true: exercise & pets can help reduce anxiety

Categories
Uncategorized

Scandinavian Gothic

A Loom with a View

(Kulturen i Lund)

Categories
Uncategorized

Life in Sweden

(Jakriborg)

Categories
Uncategorized

Cinematic Tenets

First visit to a cinema in 2020 and two thumbs up for TENET. We wore our masks even though it’s not required here and felt safe the entire time.

Categories
Uncategorized

Cows are cool

All the more reason not to eat them.

(Gothenburg)

Categories
Uncategorized

Aeroseum

100’ below the Göteborg outskirts is Aeroseum, a fascinating aviation museum in a sprawling subterranean Cold War hangar. They have parking for those flying in on their own aircraft, kid-friendly activities, and staff remarkably tolerant of all your Danger Zone jokes.

Categories
Uncategorized

Bron/Broen

Checking out Saga Norén’s favorite hangouts. #TheBridge #NordicNoir

Categories
Uncategorized

MALMÖ FLËXIN

(Turning Torso)

Categories
Uncategorized

Marital Counseling

Marry someone smarter than you are but make them do stupid things with you

(Malmö, Sweden)

Categories
Uncategorized

American Style Snack Box

I have many questions regarding this supermarket’s “American Taste” selection.

(Lidl Supermarket, Lund, Sweden)

Categories
Uncategorized

Traffic Calming, the Swedish Way

Swedish traffic calming on a two-way street: bus-bulb, neckdown, speed hump. How much safer NYC would be if we installed just a few dozen of these in the right places.

(Lund, Sweden)

Categories
Uncategorized

First Flight

First flight in nine months: EWR-CPH on a barely year-old SAS A350.

It’s nice to be in the air again.

Categories
Uncategorized

How to Wear a Mask

Just watched a properly-masked couple do the “not quite” in front of this sign to make each other laugh. My work is done.

Categories
Uncategorized

Birthday Style

Thanks everyone for the recent birthday wishes. I’m still just a middle-aged version of this kid & still looking for adult-sized versions of these clothes.

Categories
Uncategorized

An R68 with a View

Who needs an Amtrak sightseer lounge car when you can have an R68 without a roll sign? These windows are huge.

Categories
Uncategorized

Monday Inspiration

Now more than ever, let’s look out for each other.

Categories
Uncategorized

Ralph’s of Nutley


When visiting hometown, must also visit Ralph’s

Categories
Uncategorized

Yakety yak

Yakety yak, what’s up Cat

Categories
Uncategorized

Jeepney

A good start, but even safer would be a traffic signal with LPI (Leading Pinoy Interval). #AsianTransportPlanningJokes

Categories
Uncategorized

The Neighborhood DJ


I’m strongly against noise pollution in all forms, but sometimes our neighborhood DJ’s tracks are so good that I turn down my music so that I can hear his.

Categories
Uncategorized

Plant-Based Excess


I may be going vegan but I’m still going to spend 45% of my calories on dessert.

Categories
Moto Uncategorized

Motorcycling 101

A beautiful day for Motorcycling 101

Categories
Uncategorized

Mask Force September: 149 St-Grand Concourse

My idea of a good time is giving out free masks to transit riders. Yours too? Volunteer for the MTA #MaskForce!

Categories
Uncategorized

Com Tam Ninh Kieu

The Bronx has NYC’s largest Cambodian population and a significant number of Vietnamese too. Although it was late afternoon, I couldn’t resist having the extremely potent iced coffee and now I’ll probably be up all night.

Categories
Uncategorized

Everyone smiles when you wear a mask

Everyone smiles when you wear a mask on MTA subways & buses. We also hope you smile when you see our new campaign on your next ride.

Categories
Uncategorized

Little Manila

Little Manila in Woodside is small but mighty. I love that you can dine outdoors with the Flushing Line rumbling overhead.

Categories
Uncategorized

White Castles of Harlem

Harlem has the only two White Castles in Manhattan, so I never travel far for my Impossible Slider fix. I wish they’d convert this parking lot to outdoor dining.

Categories
Uncategorized

Bridge of Missed Opportunities


Always amazes me that 1) this is the entrance to the Manhattan Bridge & 2) how utterly underutilized this space is

Categories
Uncategorized

Good UX Really Matters

Thank you US Census Bureau for making your online questionnaire available in Japanese & so easy to use. You empowered my 68 year old stepdad to complete by himself his first census after decades in the US. He’s never even used a web browser before this.

Categories
Uncategorized

B-Division Luxury

I’ve been living on the IRT (51’ length, ~8’ width) for so long now that whenever I’m on a 75’ train (~10’ width) it feels luxurious

Categories
Uncategorized

Cat Airways

It’s a tough time for airlines. But while some are curling up on the tarmac to sleep it off, others are pouncing. Cat Airways proudly introduces the new 228 Feliner, tail number UR-MEOW, with daily non-stops across the apartment.

Categories
Uncategorized

Hiding in Plain Sight

Got my wife hooked on Sarah Kendzior’s Hiding in Plain Sight because I couldn’t stop raving about it. It’s an essential history & survival guide for what’s happening right now.

Categories
Uncategorized

Cats & Masks


TJ is speaking to me even more than usual today

Categories
Uncategorized

Open Dining: KTown

Ktown seems to be doing a particularly great job with outdoor dining. I’m happy to play my small part.

Categories
Uncategorized

High Line, No Waiting

If you love the High Line but not crowds, there’s never been a better time to visit. Please support the nearby businesses, too. #daycation

Categories
Uncategorized

TWA Hotel Daycation (Part 2)

A few more daycation shots. Most of the shops and bars are closed, but if you just want to enjoy the building, this is a great time to visit.

Categories
Uncategorized

TWA Hotel Daycation (Part 1)

Daycation at the TWA Hotel

Categories
Uncategorized

Streecha

Delicious Ukrainian lunch from Streecha (СТРІЧА), hidden away on 7 St in the East Village. Best pirogies & borscht I’ve ever had not made by my grandmother-in-law.

Categories
Uncategorized

Chinatown Ice Cream Factory

Helping NYC small businesses by doing what I do best: eating. Great to see so many Chinatown & Koreatown outdoor dining options.

Categories
Uncategorized

Subway Signs

THE EAGLE HAS LANDED, after some semi-competent measuring & drilling.

(Get yours at the official MTA Memorabilia & Collectibles page.)

Categories
Uncategorized

Transit is for Everyone

86 St in Bay Ridge is the subway’s newest accessible station & there’s many more to come. My MTA colleagues Alex Elegudin & Victor Calise are leading the charge to get it done. Because transit is for everyone. #ada30

Categories
Uncategorized

Mask Force July: Times Square-42 St

Would you accept a free mask from this guy? Over 1,050 subway riders did during my @mtanyctransit Mask Force shift. It’s obviously my winning smile.

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena

Supposedly

Supposedly cats don’t know what cameras are. Supposedly they just randomly & inadvertently put themselves in photogenic situations.

Categories
Uncategorized

Back to Chung Wah

First haircut with Mei in over 4 months! Please support #ChinatownNYC businesses — they really need help right now.

Categories
Uncategorized

You Have One Job

We have just one ask: when on transit, wear your mask

Categories
Uncategorized

Real-Time Strip Maps


Yesterday was the formal intro of the real-time screen content you may have seen in the subway.

I sketched the strip map on my iPad and soon amazing MTA colleagues had a working prototype. The team spent the next several months testing, refining, and rolling them out to the system as part of a super-cool digital station dashboard.

We hope you find them useful.

Categories
Uncategorized

Transit Pride

🏳️‍🌈 PUBLIC 🚇 TRANSIT 🚍 GOT ❤️ PRIDE 🏳️‍🌈

Categories
Uncategorized

Enough with the Fireworks

As a fellow Harlem resident, I endorse this message

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena

Birthday Cat 2020

Happy 10th birthday to my dearest Helena. You can’t ask for a better cat to spend a pandemic with. 

Categories
Uncategorized

Lunch at Pisillos

First meal together in over two months! We may be socially distant, but we’re still family.

Categories
Books Design Science

Orange is the Word

Reading for a rainy day in NYC. The book cover colors are purely coincidental, I swear. #massimovignelli #sovietspacegraphics

Categories
Uncategorized

Vyshyvanka Day

Happy Vyshyvanka Day to all who celebrate! 🇺🇦

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena

Tired/Wired

Tired: drone delivery from Amazon
Wired: balloon delivery of cat treats

Categories
Uncategorized

Leaving Randall’s Island

Leaving Randall’s Island via the Wards Island Bridge at 4x speed

Categories
Ailurophilia Helena

Essential Cat Working